Category Archives: Roofing

EJOT Opticore Delivers Black and White Benefits for Membrane-faced Composite Panels

Ejot Opticore fastening system

In response to building application trends, EJOT UK has technically updated its Opticore fastening system. Opticore, the unique integral nylon fastener head, is manufactured with precision cutting fins that core through membrane faced insulated panels, with the encapsulated fastener self-drilling the substrate in one simple operation. Installation is via a bi-hex or internal torx dual-driving option.

EJOT’s research and development team has taken on board customer feedback by lengthening Opticore’s light section fastener within the range, to 32mm – thus taking into account multi-lap applications. The black encapsulated Opticore carbon steel specification offers a corrosion resistant ‘Climadur’ organic coating, whilst the white encapsulated A2 stainless range is manufactured from high quality grade 304 stainless steel. The Opticore range also includes stitchers, defined for site by a new grey encapsulation.

The overall result is a fastening range for hot and cold rolled steel as well as timber substrates, that cores, drills and fixes without compromise to the liner sheet – and improves thermal retention.

A specifier’s sample pack is available directly from the manufacturer.

Cupa Pizarras roofing slate for a prestigious development located in a conservation area

Easton Square, an exclusive development of four bespoke, luxury 6-bedroom houses, features CUPA 12 R Excellence roofing slates.  The product was selected for its superior qualities including its adaptability, longevity and polished finish.   

CUPA 12 slate

The exclusive Langton Homes development is set in large private grounds in Great Easton.  Each property features over 5,500 square feet of accommodation and has been tailored towards the individual needs of each occupier.  CUPA 12 slate has been used across all four Easton Square dwellings including the properties’ associated outbuildings and garages. 

CUPA 12 slate

Supplied through Castle Roofing Supplies, CUPA 12 is a dark grey slate with thin laminations and a smooth matt surface. Available in six sizes, it has exceptional consistency of thickness and surface appearance; it is split to an average thickness of 5mm and 6mm.  In addition, the slates conform to the product specification requirements of BS EN 12326-1 and are certified for resistance to freeze or thaw. 

CUPA 12 slate

Commenting on the choice of CUPA 12 slate for Easton Square, Jonathan Arksey, at BRP Architects said: “Our aim was to deliver an uncompromising design to reflect the natural beauty of the homes’ surroundings, with excellent quality of build, intricate craftsmanship and superior finishes.  CUPA PIZARRAS slate’s timeless appearance not only complements all the external materials that make up the dwellings, but is also in harmony with roofing used throughout the neighbouring Conservation Area of Great Easton”.

CUPA 12 slate

Robert Cannon from roofing installers R and N Roofing, said: “CUPA 12 slate is a heavy and durable material which is not only straightforward to work with, but also allows for the extensive coverage required to reach the desired quality of finish.  Also, due to the dwellings’ pitched roofs it is important that the materials can adapt to the demands of varying gradient levels, which CUPA 12 slate does perfectly”.

For more information on Cupa Pizarras, please visit www.cupapizarras.com/uk.

New Technical Brochure for Optigreen

Optigreen, the specialist green roof systems supplier, have released an updated version of their fully comprehensive Technical Brochure.

Green roof systems

Consisting of 96 pages, the brochure combines basic and specialist knowledge of roof greening and gives safe and approved solutions in accordance with GRO and FLL Green Roofing Guidelines.

Each green roof system solution is presented with the most relevant data, system build-ups, accessory products and a brief description.

The brochure also includes some new Optigreen products and system solutions for blue roofs, pitched roofs and roof planters.

Webcodes included in the new brochure, mean you will always be able to access up to date information on all our optimised products and systems through our website www.optigreen.co.uk. The online version of the continuously updated brochure has interactive features and links to further information and services.

To request a free copy of the new Optigreen technical brochure, please contact info@optigreen.co.uk

Keeping Safe(site) in the sun

Construction Safety - Best PracticeWith temperatures soaring to scorching levels across the UK, off come the shirts on many building sites throughout the country, as workers attempt to deal with the intense heat. Whilst this might feel like a good idea at the time, this can often put them at an even greater risk of skin cancer.

The Imperial College London carried out a survey which showed 48 deaths and 241 cases of melanoma skin cancer each year are caused by ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun at work, and construction workers account for a staggering 44 per cent of these deaths.

Katie Prestidge, who is running roofing systems provider Marley Eternit’s Safe in the Sun Campaign, said: “These latest findings show that there is no room for complacency when it comes to sun safety on site. Most people are careful about applying sun cream when they are abroad on holiday, but wouldn’t necessarily think of taking the same precautions when spending seven hours outside in the summer at work yet, it is just as, if not more, dangerous.

“It is thought that working in the sun could lead to one death and around five new cases of melanoma each week. Yet, 90% of all skin cancer deaths are preventable if workers on site take simple, sun safety precautions.”

With these shocking new figures in mind, we have put together a list of simple, easy-to-follow tips which can help you stay safe in the sun, and may prevent the development of a serious condition such as melanoma in the long term.

> Instead of removing clothes to beat the heat, try to wear long, loose clothing, made from close woven fabric, as this protects your skin from UV rays.

> Make sure you protect your neck and head. 80% of skin cancers develop here, so covering these areas can go a long way to preventing skin cancer. Wear a hat with a brim or flap to cover your ears as well as the back of your neck. Aim for fabrics which have a UPF of 30+

> Avoid the midday sun if possible. UV levels are highest from April until mid-September, so try to stay in the shade during breaks, specifically between 11am and 3pm.

> Despite common belief, having a tan does not protect you from further sun damage. Always make sure you use a high factor sunscreen and reapply regularly. Though this seems obvious, many people don’t apply enough protection to exposed areas or leave enough time for the cream to soak in before going out.

> Drinking plenty of water keeps you from getting dehydrated, and keeps your skin healthy.

> Check your skin often: catching melanoma earlier improves the chances of any treatment, so keep an eye out for any irregular moles or spots. If you find anything out of the ordinary, see your doctor as soon as possible. Moles are the most aggressive form of skin cancer so pay extra attention to these.

> Check the UV index regularly. There are apps which can give you the UV rating as part of the weather forecast, or you can visit the Met Office website.

Remember, 90% of all skin cancer occurrences are preventable, and following the advice in this article will go a long way to keeping you, or your workers, safe in the heat. Click here to view or download our safe working in the sun infographic.

http://www.safesite.co.uk

Redland Craftsman Albury crowns eco-home with period twist

As experienced self-builders Richard and Jo Collings had high standards for their final project – a four-bedroomed energy efficient house in rural Warwickshire – so they chose the Albury tile from the Rosemary Clay Craftsman range developed by Redland, the UK’s leading manufacturer and supplier of pitched roof systems.

clay roof tiles

“We’re in a conservation area, so we had to be careful what we chose, and we really liked the look of these tiles. We’ve had a lot of compliments and the planners were happy as they stipulated that it should be ‘of a pleasing design’ and “not jar”, says Mrs Collings.

The planners at Stratford District Council were concerned not simply because the house was in a conservation area, but also because it would be next to a historic church, parts of which date back to Norman times.

“We reckoned it would take two years in all, a year to get planning and a year to build”, says Mrs Collings. “And we were right overall but it took 14 months to get the planning permission”. The new home replaces a 1960s bungalow and its roof now complements that of the recently re-roofed church.

Mr and Mrs Collings are experienced in running construction projects, having previously built their own factory unit and refurbished a historic cottage, and so designed the house themselves, using a local surveyor, Paul Upfield, to draw up the plans to gain planning permission. Among the eco-friendly features are a heat recovery system in the roof that extracts heat from outgoing air to heat incoming fresh air and a ground source heat pump that draws heat from 85 metres below ground. “It’s been very satisfying and we’ve had a great sense of achievement but we won’t be doing this again. They’ll take us out in a box”, Mrs Collings jokes.

The Albury tile is one of three tiles in the Rosemary Clay Craftsman range and, in common with the Hawkhurst tile, has a fine orange-red sanding over the surface and random black patterning to recreate a weathered look. The latest addition to the range, Victorian, has a darker and grittier texture to give roofs a greater depth of texture and character. All three tiles are versatile and can be laid on a variety of roof configurations, as there is a full range of compatible fittings and accessories.

clay roof tiles

Combining the look and feel of an aged handmade tile with 21st century performance, the Rosemary Clay Craftsman range has textured surfaces, irregular distortions to the front edge and varying hanging lengths.

Although the Rosemary Clay Craftsman looks like a reclaimed tile, it meets all the requirements ofBS5534: 2014 Code of Practice for Slating and Tiling – providing Redland fixing recommendations are followed. Redland engineers have subjected the tile to driving winds and high rains in the Group’s wind tunnel in a set of rigorous tests to ensure that it meets or exceeds current standards. Visit www.redland.co.uk/craftsman for more details.

www.redland.co.uk

 

H+H and SIG Offsite collaboration helps meet housing demand

Celcon Elements

In a unique collaboration, H+H UK Ltd and SIG Offsite have worked together to create the SIG I-House – an innovative housebuilding system incorporating Celcon Elements from H+H. 

The SIG I-House provides all the speed of offsite construction with the familiarity of a traditional build, from foundations to roof in just five days.

The system can encompass the inner leaves of external cavity walls, floors, lintel, cavity closers, insulation and roof trusses. With the inclusion of soffit and fascia, the system delivers the internal skin of a property, fully wrapped and ready for follow-on trades.

Created at a time when there is a demand to increase the volume of house building and when skilled workers are in short supply, the system is a one stop shop for clients – with a single contractor required to deliver the whole house shell.

The system is intended for the construction of domestic houses of up to two storey height, replacing the structure of the inner leaf of external cavity walls, separating walls and internal partitions with storey height Celcon Elements.

Installed by the SIG Offsite team, Celcon Elements are craned into place and fixed using H+H element mortar.  Timber I-Joist cassette floors are used in conjunction with the system to maintain the speed of build and roofs are either standard truss construction or the ‘Roofspace I-Roof’ – panelised roof system.  All components are raised into position by crane.

Celcon Elements are manufactured from the same intrinsic material as aircrete blocks and have the same performance advantages including excellent thermal performance with reduced heat loss at thermal bridges.

https://www.hhcelcon.co.uk

Why you need to tread carefully on fragile roofs

By Soni Sheimar, General Manager, Easi-Dec

Every year nine people on average fall to their deaths from fragile roofs or through roof lights. Many more suffer serious, life-changing injuries.

Falls through fragile roofs or materials usually occur on the roofs of factories, warehouses and farm buildings where workers are carrying out repairs, maintaining or installing equipment, cleaning gutters and skylights, or whilst carrying out general roof work.   All these accidents are fully avoidable through careful planning and ensuring safe working procedures.

roof safety

What is a fragile surface?

Work on fragile surfaces is high risk, and as a result, the HSE requires that effective precautions are taken for any form of work on or near fragile surfaces.  Accidents can be avoided as long as suitable equipment is used and those carrying out the work are provided with adequate information, training and supervision.

Access onto a roof is often required for maintenance, inspection, cleaning or general repairs.   Fragile surfaces such as the ones we are reading about are typically found on factories and warehouses and can include:

·     Roof lights and skylights

·     Corroded metal sheets

·     Non-reinforced fibre cement sheets

·     Roof slates and tiles

·     Glass such as wired glass

How to tread carefully

The principles of working on fragile surfaces are exactly the same as any other form of work at height, so if you apply the hierarchy of control you should be able to ensure that the work can be carried out safely. 

In an ideal world, the preferred option is to avoid working at height, but as we all know this isn’t always possible, so the next consideration would be to look at methods which would allow work to be carried out without actually stepping onto the roof itself, such as MEWPs.

If access onto the fragile roof cannot be overcome then you will need to look at how the area can be accessed safely and then put into place measures that can alleviate the distance and consequences of a potential fall.   

This can be done in a number of ways, such as protecting the edge of the roof with guardrail, using staging or platforms with edge protection on the roof to spread the load or by protecting fragile roof lights and skylights with a cover to prevent access onto the surface itself.  

roof safety

When access is needed to run from the eaves to the ridge, mesh walkways could be used to spread the weight across the support battens so that workers can safely move along the full length of the systems.

Lightweight mobile walking frames on the other hand are ideal for maintenance of valleys and box gutters on fragile roofs and can provide safe access for up to two people.

A responsible approach

Falls through fragile surfaces account for nearly a fifth of all fatalities as a result of a fall from height in the construction industry.  The worker in the case I highlighted at the start of this post was lucky in that he survived.  However he did suffer serious injuries to his back and sternum and wore a full body brace for six weeks following the incident.

Companies have a legal duty to ensure they have done all they can to prevent accidents and with the range of products available today, particularly for working on fragile materials, there really is no reason for these accidents to still be happening.

For more information, visit www.easi-dec.co.uk

Top Tips for Safe Spring Maintenance

By Soni Sheimar, Easi-Dec General Manager

With the arrival of spring, and winter firmly behind us, now is the time for business owners and landlords to take a look at the roofs of their premises to see what damage the colder months left in their wake.

Whether you are a contractor or the owner of the premises, it is important you know the best way to safely inspect and maintain a building, to ensure the safety of yourself and any contractors in your care.

Planned maintenance can include both plant and equipment as well as repairs to the roof itself, dependent on the type of roof.

If you follow these top tips, you’ll be able to ensure you avoid any issues, such as serious injury or worse, when carrying out spring maintenance.

1. It doesn’t matter what height you’re working at, work at height is by nature dangerous, even more so in the months after winter, when all manner of horrible damage can be hiding away. When possible, try to avoid having to work at height, if this isn’t possible then look at alternative ways to do the work. For example, if cleaning windows, use a reach and wash system rather than a ladder. if you absolutely have to use a ladder then always take advantage of the Easi-Dec Ladder accessories range to provide further support.

Easi-Dec ladder safety

2. Make sure that you always carry out a risk assessment before starting the work to determine what equipment you will need and to identify who could potentially be in danger or be affected by your work. Is there the possibility that someone could be hit by falling objects?

3. When using a ladder, carry out pre-use checks to identify any defects or damages which could prevent safe use. Areas to inspect include the stiles, feet, rungs, steps/treads, platform and locking mechanisms. Make sure the ladder is long enough or high enough for the specific task. Make sure the ground is firm and level and clear of any debris.

4. Always make sure that the user is competent to carry out the work. Competency is essential. Only those who are fully trained in working at height and using equipment such as ladders safely will have the correct skills, knowledge and experience to work safely.

5. And perhaps most importantly of all, always plan the work carefully. This is even more vital after the winter months when there could be hidden risks.

Working at height can be dangerous at the best of times, so remember, if you are not sure about anything or do not believe you are competent or capable of carrying out the task at hand, always seek professional advice.

Good to know: Easi-Dec offers many different products and systems to make working at height all year round safer and more efficient.

http://easi-dec.co.uk/

This new slate roof enhances the charm of the Renfrew Town Hall

If there is one thing especially remarkable in Scotland, that is its historical buildings, still retaining their original charm. The best evidence of this is the Renfrew Town Hall and Museum: a heritage building full of history that doesn’t go unnoticed for anyone visiting the area.

natural slate

Renfrew is a small Scottish town located 6 miles west of Glasgow, in a strategic area of Scotland, being therefore the scene of numerous military confrontations. That’s why its architecture oozes centuries of history.

Located downtown Renfrew, it is a truly architectural jewel, an impressive 19th-century building dominating the Renfrew skyline with its fairytale towers. The highest one rises to more than 100 feet and has become a symbol of the civic pride evident in town during its industrial heyday.

However, this is not the original Town Hall of Renfrew. The first one was originally built in 1670, and was used as a jail until 1839.  The current Town Hall was built in 1872.

After a £5.2m refurbishment programme, the building reopened in January 2012, having been fully restored and extended to house the new Renfrew Museum. As part of this renovation programme, the Renfrew Town Hall roof has been recently renewed with Heavy 3 natural slate. This slate has been the perfect choice to keep its original appeal of Scottish tradition and heritage.

natural slate

CUPA HEAVY 3™ slate is quarried from San Pedro de Trones in northern Spain. This quarry belonging to multinational company CUPA PIZARRAS, has been in operation since 1892. Actually it’s the oldest quarry in activity in the world and produces some 25,000 tons each year!

Heavy 3 is one of the key products of CUPA PIZARRAS, the world leader in natural slate. It’s a blue-black slate with a slightly gritty texture, perfect to withstand the high wind speeds and driving rain common throughout Scotland.

For further information about CUPA PIZARRAS’ products, visit its website: http://www.cupapizarras.com/uk/

Redland boosts tile manufacture with multimillion-pound investment

DuoPlainRedland – the UK’s leading manufacturer and supplier of pitched roof systems – has announced that it is to build a new manufacturing line for its plain-tile appearance product, DuoPlain, and large-format concrete tiles and slates. The multimillion-pound investment will help secure supply of these products into a UK market that is currently experiencing huge demand and extensive lead times.

The new line, which will come on stream later this year, will be located at the company’s Shawell plant, its most centrally located facility. Work on the installation is underway, and a number of new skilled jobs will be created when production commences.

Commenting on the announcement, Georg Harrasser, CEO of the Braas Monier Building Group, Redland’s parent, said: “This is a significant investment at an important time in the UK housebuilding industry. The new line gives us not only increased capacity, but also increased flexibility, improving our ability to meet the growing UK market demands for specific roof tile formats. This flexibility will be welcomed by the market as a whole, which is experiencing long lead times for these high-growth products”.

Andy Dennis, Country Manager UK & Ireland, added: “The drive to build more homes, fueled by Government targets and a generally buoyant housing market, has put enormous pressure on manufacturers like ourselves. The UK’s ability to build more homes is restricted by the availability of roof tiles and other construction materials. Demand currently outstrips supply, especially for large-format and plain-appearance tiles, which housebuilders have been increasingly adopting as their preferred formats”.

He continues: “The new line at Shawell demonstrates not only a commitment to our customers and the industry, but also shows the confidence that the Braas Monier Building Group has in Redland. We will, as a result of this investment, be better placed to meet the challenges faced by the UK housebuilding industry”.

www.redland.co.uk