Category Archives: Structural Engineering

Totally verifiable performance standards from Schöck

Ecobuild Stand B133

thermal break technology

Innovative product developments, unrivalled performance certification and an exciting range of software support packages, all combine to strengthen Schöck’s continued position as the number one supplier of verifiable performance thermal break technology.

This year, Schöck pushes the boundaries further with its new  generation of Schöck concrete-to-concrete Isokorb, offering unrivalled thermal performance for both standard and Passivhaus construction.     Also on display is the Isokorb type AXT – offering a more thermally efficient and more durable alternative to wrapped parapets and minimum savings of 10% on construction costs.

The rest of the Isokorb family, for concrete-to-steel and steel-to-steel connectivity are on display too – all with the reassurance of the new BBA certification, verifying Schöck to the most up-to-date industry requirements.    Among the latest software packages there is the new Calculation Software for the Isokorb type KS and the Thermal Bridge Calculator.   A brand new customer focussed website is being launched and you can get up-to-date information on the latest BIM developments.

The Schöck team is of course on hand to discuss any of the new developments and to offer ‘live’ consultancy advice on any project specific requirements you may have.

Contact Schöck on 01865 290 890 or visit www.schoeck.co.uk

Big Foot Systems Shortlisted in H&V News Awards for Coca-Cola European Partners GB Project

rooftop support solutions

Sussex-based Big Foot Systems, which leads the way in non-penetrative rooftop support solutions for building services and safe access equipment, is delighted to announce that is has been shortlisted in the prestigious H&V News Awards for its project with Coca-Cola European Partners Great Britain (CCEP GB). Named as a finalist in the ‘Retrofit Project of the Year’ category, Big Foot supplied a custom Safe Access solution and HD Beams rooftop plant support to a project at CCEP GB’s Wakefield manufacturing plant.

The H&V News Awards’ judges reported that they received a high number and quality of entries this year and so making it onto the shortlist is a fantastic achievement. Big Foot Systems will now present their entry directly to the judges in March. The winners will then be announced at the esteemed H&V News Awards on Thursday 20th April 2017 at the Grosvenor House Hotel on Park Lane, London.

We are thrilled to have been shortlisted in such prestigious awards on such a high profile project. It was a complex project at what is the largest soft drinks manufacturing plant, by volume, in Europe” explains Sam Birch, Big Foot Systems’ Product Manager. “We were able to provided the preferred solution whilst ensuring minimal disruption to the Wakefield manufacturing plant.”

CCEP GB wanted to increase the production hall cooling ventilation capacity by adding two new air handling units to the existing lightweight standing seam roof. The project needed to ensure minimal disruption to operations during the new installation and reduce the risk of a leaking roof above a facility capable of producing 6,000 cans of soft drink and up to 2,200 bottles every minute.

Having previously worked with Big Foot Systems, the CCEP GB consultant on the project suggested the possibility of using Big Foot to provide a plant and service support strategy which would eliminate the need to penetrate the roof.

The lightweight roof construction posed an additional challenge for the project, but one that Big Foot Solutions met. The Big Foot technical team worked collaboratively with HE Barnes, the contractor for the project, and their structural engineer across many months. Big Foot’s technical team was able to propose several options for consideration, leading to a fully-developed solution using their HD Beam product to span the main rafters and the purlins, while taking the load back to the main rafters. The solution also provided safe access for maintenance of the newly installed AHUs.

To assist the smooth installation, Big Foot’s Technical Team carried out several site surveys. The engineered design and technical support by Big Foot allowed HE Barnes to provide a detailed lifting plan and method statement to the CCEP GB Health and Safety team. Big Foot’s Technical Team was also on site for the frame erection and AHU crane lift to the roof, utilising a 250 tonne crane with a 60-metre reach. Thanks to meticulous planning and preparation, the full installation was carried out seamlessly within five hours of the crane being set up. Big Foot therefore provided the best solution with minimal disruption to CCEP GB’s Wakefield manufacturing plant.

An HD Beam is a non-penetrative support frame for chillers, AHUs, packaged plant, generators, pipes and steels. It is a robust but flexible solution where space may be limited, or there is a requirement to position directly over existing structural roof steels. Weight is then evenly distributed across the specified quantity of HD Beams. It is also height adjustable to maintain a level system on roof falls up to 5 degrees.

The Big Foot Safe Access range is designed to allow a secure route for service engineers and other trades to gain access to plant and for managing the flow of other personnel. Offering secure and easy access to roof-top services, Big Foot will survey and design custom Safe Access systems tailored specifically to meet individual design parameters.

Offering specifiers a comprehensive range of freestanding systems, Big Foot’s products are designed and manufactured by the company for a wide variety of applications, including HVAC, solar units and safe access equipment. The product portfolio provides complete, simple, safe and secure non-penetrative, prefabricated roof support systems negating a need for time consuming and costly penetrations through the roof.

Big Foot Systems’ products and systems are quick and easy to install ensuring project cost and time clarity, thus reducing the need for complex, time-consuming and expensive detailing. Offering improved roof aesthetics, Big Foot Systems provides engineered solutions that are innovative in design, robust and repeatable. Big Foot combines market leading products and services, which include system design and on-site support. Available to install in all weathers utilising familiar componentry, all systems are designed with safety, security and simplicity in mind. Finally Big Foot Systems offers short manufacture and delivery lead times to help a project meet its schedule and stay within budget.

For further information on all products and services offered by Big Foot Systems email: enquiry@bigfootsupport.com or telephone 01323 844355.

http://www.bigfootsupport.com/

 

Cavity Trays latest building envelope solutions at the Scotland Build Show 2016

The only cavity tray company in the UK awarded European Technical Approval and the longest-established in its specialised filed is displaying its latest products at the Scotland Build Show 2016.

Cavity Trays of Yeovil has a history dating back to the 1920’s and its approved products are accompanied with a performance warranty.

Its know-how and expertise derived over almost a century is available for the benefit of Architect, Builder and Client and its latest handbook is being distributed from the stand.

The Type X cavitray for gable abutments provides a swift and effective way of arresting and controlling rain penetrating masonry above a sloping abutment.

Trays are available to suit all styles and sizes of masonry from brick to block to stone.

Each approved Type X cavitray has a ready-shaped flashing already attached, and an adjustable back upstand that now extends to cover an even wider range of cavity widths, ensuring compatibility at all times.

The Type BWVC

Type BWVC Bay Window Vertical Cavitray links lintel with the higher level roof DPC/tray and prevents damp horizontal transference between the two.
Type BWVC Bay Window Vertical Cavitray links lintel with the higher level roof DPC/tray and prevents damp horizontal transference between the two.

The full name of this new product is the Bay Window Vertical Cavitray and it overcomes a problem experienced by many during the 2013/2014 wet winter: lateral transference.

Lateral transference or ‘sideways soak’ as it is often termed, refers to exterior skin masonry becoming saturated and then permitting saturation to permeate ‘sideways’ into the structure.

It can occur to the sides of a bay window between bay roof intersection level and the lower level where the lintel runs across the bay to support the wall above.

The Type BWVC cleverly links the two whilst maintaining masonry bonding and coursing.

Its presence halts horizontal wet permeation.

This product is compatible for use with other approved cavitrays for horizontal and sloping roofs.

Preformed damp courses and trays

A range of preformed damp courses and trays for use with timber frame construction demonstrate the benefits of building using pre-shaped damp-protection solutions rather than relying on site forming and fabrication.

Pre-shaped extends the protective qualities beyond just one face of the element requiring protection, guarding against misplacement and ensuring every touch-point is both uniformly and consistently addressed.

One of over 120 designs of preformed cavitray available to suit timber construction. This model provides the requisite damp protection requirements as well as extending through the cavity and across the oversite so the arrangement protects against rising gases such as radon.
One of over 120 designs of preformed cavitray available to suit timber construction. This model provides the requisite damp protection requirements as well as extending through the cavity and across the oversite so the arrangement protects against rising gases such as radon.

 

Caviclosers

The designer now has a wider choice of caviclosers capable of reveal closing cavity widths up to 240mm wide.

The latest models include new fire-rated models that are immediately identifiable by a red prefix, eg: Cavi 60.

This signifies the cavicloser has a sixty minutes fire integrity rating.

The range extends from one hour to four hours (Cavi 240).

The Specifier is able to instantly identify and select a model with the requisite protection and cavity width qualities.

The Type RFC  – Reveal Face Closer

A reveal face closer that permits full fill insulation to be continued unpunctuated to the reveal face.

It provides a novel way of eliminating the need for separate insulating elements being required within a fully insulated cavity wall that is able to meet the thermal requirements demanded.

The Type RFC (Reveal Face Closer) may be used to close compliant cavity walls with cavity widths from 50mm to 150mm.

Visit Cavity Trays on Stand E19.
Scotland Build 2016 – 23rd & 24th November 2016

http://www.cavitytrays.co.uk

Safety Critical Fixings – What happens when it goes wrong?

construction fixings

As recently appointed full members of the Construction Fixings Association, EJOT UK is helping to promote the work of the CFA by alerting those involved in the specification and installation of safety critical fixings, to the serious consequences of “getting it wrong”.

We are all familiar with this engineering teaser:

Question: What is the most important component on a car?

Answer: The nut that holds the steering wheel in place!

Take away the humour element, and the reality is exactly the same when you apply this to countless structural scenarios. The somber truth is that life and limb are the ultimate casualties when either the correct specification or installation process fails.

Brian Mack is technical business development manager for EJOT in the UK:

“The selection, installation and certification of construction fixings on any construction project is comparatively small in terms of time and resource when taking the overall project into consideration. Yet, at EJOT we have seen on countless occasions, the results of wrongly specified fixings and the many mistakes that have presented a serious threat to life.

Ejot

“Incidents such as tunnel collapses, scaffold collapses and ducting/ME failures due to incorrectly specified, installed or set critical fixings can easily be avoided. It is vital that the correct anchoring system is chosen and that it is installed to the manufacturers recommendations; that includes drilling and preparation of the installation hole through to insertion and setting of the anchor. The Code of practice for the selection and installation of post-installed anchors in concrete and masonry, BS 8539:2012, underpins the whole process from design and testing, right through to final installation. It is a valuable document and THE source of reference for safety critical fasteners”.

rebars
Rebars

Established in 1979, the CFA is non-profit making industry-wide body comprising the major manufacturers of construction fixings that have a significant UK presence.

The Association’s work in actively promoting best practice guidance through a range of resources, makes it the leading authority on construction fixings in the UK. The CFA has been instrumental in the development and publishing of BS8539 – a British Standard Code of Practice designed to assist the specification to installation chain, with a thoroughly comprehensive guide to the roles and responsibilities in providing a high quality and safe fixing installation.

Brian Mack continues:

“As a trade association, the CFA is providing education, advice, training and technical support to all functions involved in the provision of safety critical fixings in the industry.  Here at EJOT UK, we are delighted to be now involved with this process”.

In brief, the CFA are currently providing these resources:

For Specifiers: CPD seminars reviewing the design and selection of fixings in line with BS 8539 and current European Technical Approvals.

For Contractors: CPD seminars designed to explain their responsibilities and how to implement these duties under BS 8539. This also looks at creating ‘competent installers and testers’ for projects.

Construction Fixings Association

For Installers: Certified training in the correct installation of all construction fixings to concrete and masonry.

For Testers: Certified training in the correct procedures for testing to the requirements of BS 8539 – both for proof testing and allowable load determination.

For further information about the Construction Fixings Association, its full members and its comprehensive toolkit for BS 8539, visit the Construction Fixings Association website at www.the-cfa.co.uk

http://www.ejot.co.uk/

Natural frequency and vibration behaviour of free cantilever steel balconies

Lightweight support structures, such as free-cantilevered steel balconies, can be prone to vibration when people move about on them more heavily than usual.    As designs become ever more lightweight and competitive in cost terms, particularly with very large cantilevers, the vibration behaviour of a structure takes on even more importance. 

On this scheme, the balconies are an unusually demanding 2.3m in depth
On this scheme, the balconies are an unusually demanding 2.3m in depth

So when considering the development and structural design of steel balconies, there are a whole host of influencing variables that should be taken into account.  In selecting the method of connection to the building slab, the challenge lies not only in choosing a component that ensures effectiveness as a thermal break; but one that offers a safe structural design solution as well.  An additional factor is that it also needs to be compliant with the necessary serviceability requirements.

Acceptability of vibrations

The Building Regulations Part L defines the limit values for thermal bridges; and Eurocode 3 specifies the required verifications, such as for vibration, in serviceability limit state. Such verification is the responsibility of the structural engineer, whose function it is to calculate the natural frequency of the construction depending on its utilisation.    That being said, when considering the design of the balcony construction and thermal insulating element, it is prudent to ensure that the natural frequency is greater than the limit frequency specified by the structural engineer.     Generally, vibration of floors is considered to be a serviceability issue, primarily related to discomfort.   As the perception of discomfort varies from one individual to another, no precise limit can be imposed that will guarantee satisfaction for everyone during the lifetime of the balcony.    Assessment of acceptable vibration is therefore not straightforward. However, a logical approach is to design structures so that their natural frequency is sufficiently beyond potential excitation frequencies.

Depending on the type and utilisation of the structure, published data indicates limit frequencies of between 4 Hz and 7.5 Hz.   Experience has shown that adopting a limit frequency of 7.5 Hz for steel balconies not only eliminates the possibility of undesirable vibration, it also enables the design of cost efficient structures. 

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The Schöck Isokorb performs above recommended limit frequencies

If planned properly, the Isokorb type KS for concrete-to-steel thermal connectivity allows almost any balcony geometry to be designed without constraints.     To assess how prone to vibration separated balconies using the Isokorb type KS might be, Schöck has employed the latest Natural Frequency Calculator software package.  This is a free service which uses geometric and material variables and enables project teams to identify the optimum solution for steel cantilever balcony connections early in the design process.     In most cases it will be found that the natural frequencies of normal balcony constructions are still above the recommended limit frequencies when utilising the Isokorb type KS.  

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The Schöck Isokorb type KS incorporates 80mm of insulation and is 180 mm wide and between 180 and 280mm high, to allow flexible adjustment for differing slab thicknesses.     It can be prefabricated, reducing assembly time on site and can bear extremely heavy loads.    This combination of features makes the unit ideal in meeting the various thermal and structural demands involved in the design of modern balconies. Which in the case of cantilever steel balconies, with a thermally broken connection to a concrete slab, normally sees the elements exposed to both vertical and horizontal bending moments and shear forces.   The KS has a shear-bending interaction which, based on project specific loadings, allows for a much more flexible design and results in greater tolerance when designing steel balconies. 

Schock

Recommendations for planning and designing steel balconies

The following factors influence the natural frequency and therefore the vibration behaviour of free cantilever steel balconies. Particular attention should be paid to these factors when planning and designing thermally broken steel balconies:

·     Balcony geometry, especially the cantilever length and spacing between the connections

·     Rigidity and proper execution of the stub bracket, especially on stepped thresholds

·     Sufficient transverse rigidity of the balcony construction

·     Incorporation of the stiffness of the chosen thermal insulating element into the planning process

Demandingly large balconies at Rathbone Market

A good example of unusually large cantilever steel balconies being incorporated is on the Rathbone Market scheme, part of the Canning Town and Custom House regeneration programme. A three-phase development delivering a new library, around 652 new homes and a new market square at the heart of the scheme.  Here the balconies are an unusually demanding 2.3 metres in depth.

www.schoeck.co.uk

Comprehensive Schöck range meets Embassy Gardens demands

Schock

Stretching along the south bank of the Thames from Battersea to Vauxhall, the Nine Elms area in London, for so long a neglected stretch of industrial land, has become the largest development zone in Central London.   Over the next ten it will see 20,000 homes built, along with new schools, parks, cultural centres, a pedestrian and cycle bridge over the Thames; and the opening of two new London Transport underground stations.

The residential and commercial heart of this huge development is Embassy Gardens, London’s new diplomatic precinct on the riverside.  It forms the backdrop to the new US Embassy, scheduled to relocate from Grosvenor Square during 2017.  The blocks are arranged around raised courtyards, with retail and commercial frontages at ground level that connect the Embassy Square, Linear Park and River Frontage through a network of streets and a central square.

There are differing building heights to minimise overshadowing and overlook and the buildings incorporate a wide array of public and amenity spaces including communal courtyards, roof gardens, private terraces and balconies.

 Schock

The first release of apartments in Embassy Gardens is the Ambassador Building, which comprises six distinct cores, which house not only the residential apartments, but also a fully equipped private members club to rival the best in any international hotel.

The development has inevitably attracted a sophisticated level of residents who demand the highest standards of detail throughout these buildings; and one of the key features is the wide variety of balcony types, each governed by unit size and orientation.

OISD confirms need to minimise thermal bridging

With such a demanding specification involving different balcony types, the minimisation of any possible thermal bridging problems is crucial. This is something highlighted in research findings from the Oxford Institute for Sustainable Development (OISD) at Oxford Brookes University.

It shows that with increasingly improved airtightness and fabric U-values in UK buildings, thermal bridge heat losses are responsible for an increasing percentage of the overall building heat loss.   It is common for thermal bridges to account for 20% – 30% of the heat loss in multi-residential units (as calculated by thermal modelling) and balcony connections can be a major contributor to the thermal bridge heat loss – if effective thermal isolation is not included in the design.    And the company able to offer the ideal range of solutions to the differing thermal connectivity demands posed by the complex balcony designs at the Ambassador Building is Schöck.

Isokorb type KS for concrete-to-steel

Verifiable performance standards and full compliance

The diverse range of Schöck Isokorb load-bearing thermal insulation products guarantees totally verifiable performance standards, meets full compliance with the relevant UK building regulations and offers BBA Certification and LABC Registration.   The specific requirements at the Ambassador Building involved firstly the Schöck Isokorb type K for concrete-to–concrete connectivity.

The type K units were incorporated into the cast in-situ cantilever balconies on the road facing external elevation; and where there was a shear force transfer element required, also involving concrete-to-concrete loggia’s or supported balconies, the Isokorb type Q was installed.  A further variation, Isokorb type K-WU units were also used as slab-to-wall thermal breaks.

Isokorb type KS for concrete-to-steel

The Isokorb type KS for concrete-to-steel were used on the internal courtyard balconies; and to assist the structural engineer in keeping the transverse beam continuous between the external columns, Schöck SLD dowels were also used to support the propped cantilever walkway externally.

In addition to providing highly effective connectivity solutions for concrete-to-concrete and concrete-to-steel thermal bridging situations, the Schöck Isokorb range also offers a modular product for steel-to-steel applications and even a maintenance free alternative to wrapped parapets.

When any Isokorb product type is incorporated into residential buildings, the required fRsi value – the temperature factor used to indicate condensation risk that must be equal to or greater than 0.75 – is always comfortably met.

For a free copy of the Schöck Thermal Bridging Guide and / or the Thermal Bridging Solutions brochure – contact the company on 01865 290 890 or visit www.schoeck.co.uk

Continuous ribbon balconies require effective thermal insulation

 SCHOCK

The Chiswick Point development, at Bollo Lane, in West London, is a £20m contemporary mixed-use residential scheme offering 124 one, two and three bedroom residential apartments, including three penthouses.  The apartments are either south facing single aspect, or dual aspect with some even enjoying a triple aspect.    A sustainable approach was important, with all of the units designed to meet Level 4 of the Code for Sustainable Homes, and the Lifetime Homes code.   Constructed in two blocks of six and nine storeys, the frame is mainly reinforced concrete, with the concrete frame floors and cladding providing thermal mass, which absorbs energy and slowly releases it to help reduce temperature fluctuations.

Long continuous ribbon balconies provide solar shading to the two blocks and provide the residents with a very pleasant outlook across the London Wildlife Trust nature reserve at the rear of the development.     The continuous balconies are a major feature of the scheme and with several hundred metres of them winding across the two blocks, effective thermal insulation was imperative if thermal bridging is to be avoided.   To minimise any condensation problems and subsequent mould growth as a result, plus the avoidance of thermal outflow, Schöck Isokorb type K heat-insulating load-bearing elements are installed at various strategic positions along the large expanse of balconies.   The Isokorb type K provides high thermal resistance by using stainless steel bars to act as tension and shear reinforcement, plus high-strength HTE pressure bearing modules.

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Research at the Oxford Institute for Sustainable Development (OISD) at Oxford Brookes University shows that as a result of airtightness and fabric U-values being improved in UK building, thermal bridge heat losses are responsible for an increasing percentage of the overall building heat loss.   It is common for thermal bridges to account for 20% – 30% heat loss in multi-residential units (as calculated by thermal modelling) and balcony connections can be a major contributor to the thermal bridge heat loss if effective thermal isolation is not included in the design.

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Schöck offers a number of highly effective solutions to various thermal bridging situations.   In addition to concrete-to-concrete capability, the Isokorb range provides totally verifiable solutions for concrete-to-steel, steel-to-steel and even a maintenance free alternative to wrapped parapets.  All solutions meet full compliance with the relevant UK building regulations and offer BBA Certification and LABC Registration. The requirement that the temperature factor used to indicate condensation risk (the fRsi value), in residential buildings, must be equal to or greater than 0.75 is comfortably met by incorporating the Isokorb.   It also complies with the Government Standard Assessment Procedure, SAP 2012, concerning CO2 emissions from buildings and respectively heat losses through non-repeating thermal bridges. The lambda values of the Isokorb enable energy loss to be reduced by as much as 84% to 91% in various connective situations.

For a free copy of the Schöck Thermal Bridging Guide and / or the Schöck Specifiers Guide – contact the company on 01865 290 890 or visit www.schoeck.co.uk

 

Schöck solution combines architecture with horticulture

SCHOCK
Huge medicinal herbs on the façade of the Berlin medical centre

The striking façade of this building in Berlin is the concept of Sergej Dott, a locally-based pop art painter who chose medicinal herbs to represent the building’s use as a major medical centre.   The Treptow Medical Centre, named after the district in which it is located, is a 19th century listed building and recent refurbishment work has seen the interior transformed into twelve surgeries and a pharmacy.  The final flourish of the restoration activity is the addition of the pop art herbs, each one metre in diameter, up to twelve metres high and 600kgs in weight, all grouped around three sides of the building.

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The KST makes it possible to secure the flowers directly to the medical centre’s steel structure

To incorporate them into the structural design, additional steel beams had to be installed inside the building at varying floor levels and Lorenz Linnhoff, whose engineering firm carried out the structural planning for the building comments: “The optimum solution for fastening the giant flowers to the building envelope was the Isokorb KST, which made it possible to transfer the load of the flower installation via the steel beams to the load-bearing building”.

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The KST load-bearing thermal insulation element Is used to fasten free cantilevered steel beams to steel structures

The KST has been developed to create thermal breaks in steel structures, where the modules are used to transfer tensile forces and pressure/shear forces.  With this application the product is used only for the latter purpose, as on this occasion it has to perform a structural function rather than ensure thermal partition.     Each flower is connected by two KST modules at the top of the stalk and their modular capability meant that off-site pre-fabrication was possible, helping to reduce on-site costs.  Two head plates were welded to the stalks off site and another two head plates attached to the main steel structure with the KST modules bolted to them.  Then flower stalk was then lifted into position and the two plates simply bolted to the exterior connections of the KST units.   The community arts and culture scene in Treptow wil benefit too, as each of the herbs is to be sponsored, with the proceeds donated to various art institutions.

For your free copy of the new Schöck ‘Thermal Bridging Guide’ and / or the comprehensive 236 page ‘Technical Guide’ contact the company on: 01865 290 890 go to http://www.schoeck.co.uk; or email: design@schoeck.co.uk

http://www.schoeck.co.uk

Canaletto tower balconies incorporate Schöck Isokorb

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The Canaletto residential tower at 257 City Road in London is located halfway between Old Street and Angel Stations in Islington, alongside the regenerated City Road Basin.  It comprises a 31-storey tower with 190 luxury one, two and three bedroom apartments built to the standards of Code 4 Sustainable Homes Level 4.   Among the many residential benefits of Canaletto living is a cinema, restaurant, entertainment centre and a sky terrace on the 24th floor.

The tower is concrete frame and has a curving facade of metal and glass that breaks the volume into a series of three-to-four storey clusters.  In turn, each cluster contains grouped balcony terraces, which are a striking feature of the building.  The balconies are of steel construction connected to the concrete frame and as always with cantilever construction elements of this nature, one of the early design considerations had to be the prevention of thermal bridging.

Thermal bridge heat losses are in fact responsible for an increasing percentage of the overall building heat loss, due to airtightness and fabric U-values having been improved in UK Building Regulations. Thermal modelling calculations show that for multi-residential projects such as large apartment blocks, thermal bridges could account for 20%-30% of thermal losses, with balcony connections being a major contributor if effective thermal isolation is not included in the design(1).

One of the most effective methods of combatting thermal bridging is the Isokorb range of thermal break elements from Schöck; and for the high specification Canaletto project the Isokorb type KS20 offers the ideal solution. It is a concrete-to-steel connectivity module that sits between the outer and inner structural connection points and blocks the outflow of heat through the use of high quality polystyrene insulation foam.  There are tension and shear stainless steel bars passing through it, which take the tension and shear forces between the building frame and the balconies, enabling a thermally insulated, load bearing connection to be made between reinforced concrete and steel construction components.  The type KS provides a clean and unobtrusive connection detail, minimises on-site assembly time and enables a high level of prefabrication.

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The Isokorb range provides a huge selection of solutions for concrete-to-concrete and steel-to-steel, as well as concrete-to-steel – and the entire range offers the security of BBA Certification and LABC Registration. It also comfortably exceeds the requirements of BRE IP1/06 and Part L of the Building Regulations where the temperature factor used to indicate condensation and mould growth risk (fRSI) must be greater than, or equal to, 0.75 for residential buildings.

In addition, there is also compliance with the Government Standard Assessment Procedure, SAP 2012, concerning CO2 emissions from buildings and respectively heat losses through non-repeating thermal bridges.  Here, the lambda values of the Schöck Isokorb enable energy loss in various connective situations to be reduced by as much as 84% to 91%.

For your free copy of the new (1)Thermal Bridging Guide and / or the Schöck Specifiers Guide – contact the company on 01865 290 890 or visit www.schoeck.co.uk

 

Riverwalk incorporates high specification Schöck Isokorb

SCHOCK

London’s three historic embankments – Chelsea, Victoria and Albert – are currently being transformed as part of a regeneration scheme that will replace many of the outdated buildings which have characterised these areas for so long.  The result will see the development of new homes, promenades and parks – and one of these commanding new developments, on the north bank of the Thames, is the stunning Riverwalk, at Millbank, designed by Stanton Williams.

Riverwalk features two organically shaped buildings of 7 and 17 storeys, connected by a central podium and incorporating 116 high specification one, two, three and four bedroom apartments, plus penthouses. The design focus is on light, space and service, as well as exceptional views across the River Thames.   Extensive planting on roofs, balconies and terraces, most significantly on the first floor podium terrace, also contribute to a substantial improvement in the green footprint and biodiversity of the site.

Aesthetically the buildings are enhanced further by horizontal bands of limestone on the curving facades between the glazing and ceramic panels, with the stonework wrapping around the lower parts of the balconies to create a continuous organic shape. The balconies vary in depth and this in turn provides the outer façade with a sense of depth, along with natural solar shading.

With such a high specification development it is not surprising to find that enormous consideration was given to the avoidance of the thermal bridging at the critical balcony connections; and the structural thermal break module specified throughout is the latest generation Isokorb type KXT from market leaders Schöck.

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The type KXT – for concrete-to-concrete applications – offers such a high level of insulation that the Passivhaus Institute in Darmstadt has awarded the product with the “low thermal bridge construction” certificate and confirmed its suitability even for passivhaus construction.

A major reason for the superior performance of the Isokorb type KXT is the thickness of the insulation body. This is  increased from the standard 80mm thick to 120mm, providing an even more efficient solution. The KXT not only improves thermal insulation performance by up to 30% in comparison to to the standard range, it also improves impact sound insulation by around 50% as well.  High quality stainless steel bars with improved tensile strength is an integral part of the unit and while the same load-bearing capacity is maintained, there is a smaller rod diameter and therefore a reduction in the thermally conducting cross-section, resulting in a further increase in the heat insulation performance.

A further reason for the superior performance of the Isokorb type KXT is the HTE module, a pressure bearing block made of steel fibre reinforced high-performance concrete with Kronolith, a titanium ore aggregate from Kronos Titan.  The unit offers architects and engineers a variety of design options and there is even the capability to construct stepped height balconies, with increased fire protection also taken into account, as the HTE module offers fire-resistance class F 120.

Schöck, is a specialist in the provision of advanced solutions for thermal energy structural insulation and best known for its range of structural thermal break units.  It is a range which allows connections to be made between concrete-to-concrete, concrete-to-steel and steel-to-steel and all units meet full compliance with the relevant building regulations, while also providing BBA Certification and LABC Registration.   The requirement described in BRE IP1/06 – a document cited in Building Regulations Approved Documents Part L1 and L2 and Section 6 in Scotland – states that the temperature factor used to indicate condensation risk (fRSI) must be greater than, or equal to, 0.75 for residential buildings and this is easily met by incorporating the Isokorb.

In addition, there is also compliance with the Government Standard Assessment Procedure, SAP 2012, concerning CO2 emissions from buildings and respectively heat losses through non-repeating thermal bridges.  Here, the lambda values of the Schöck Isokorb enable energy loss in various connective situations to be reduced by as much as 84% to 91%.

For your free copy of the Schöck Specifiers Guide and / or the new Thermal Bridging Guide – contact the company on 01865 290 890 or visit www.schoeck.co.uk