Tag Archives: Mitsubishi Electric

Building services can help everyone be lean, mean and green

Martin Fahey Head of Sustainability and Commercial Business at Mitsubishi Electric looks at how the building services industry can help us all be energy efficient.

#TheHubME

It may seem strange for a manufacturer of heating, cooling, ventilation and controls to say to its customers “use less equipment”, but that is exactly the message that Mitsubishi Electric is urging everyone involved in the built environment to take on board.

The Green Gateway philosophy asks everyone involved in the industry, from architects, consultants, specifiers, installers, facilities managers, building owners and individual households to ‘Do the right thing’ with regards to energy use by adopting a ‘Lean, Mean and Green’ approach.

We need to work together to do this because buildings currently account for around half all UK greenhouse emissions, which is more than both industry and transport.  It is therefore clear where the challenge lies and our industry can have a significant role to play in helping the country meet the ambitious carbon reduction targets that have been set.

Read the full article here: https://thehub.mitsubishielectric.co.uk

 

Mr Slim R32 models bring advanced benefits at the same price

Mitsubishi Electric has launched of a new range of air conditioning units utilising the new refrigerant R32 which will be available at the same price as the equivalent R410A units.air conditioning units utilising the new refrigerant R32

The R32 Mr Slim Power Inverter split type models are the second product range in the company’s UK line-up to utilise R32 refrigerant – which has a low global warming potential (GWP).

“We have kept the price exactly the same as our current R410A Mr Slim Power Inverter line up as we see this eliminating a big hurdle in the adoption of this new refrigerant, which is an important change to help combat global warming,” explains Carl Dickinson on behalf of the company.

“Anyone planning on using, designing or installing air conditioning in the coming years will now need to take into account the GWP of the system to meet the requirements of the F-Gas Regulations,” adds Dickinson.

In March 2014, the European Parliament passed the 2014 EU F-Gas Regulation legislation with the key objective of reducing F-Gas emissions by 79% between 2015 and 2030. The overall intention is to cut the availability of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) with a high GWP.

The F-Gas Regulations will have a major impact on the air conditioning sector and any option for the next generation of refrigerant gas must be able to meet the demands of this stringent legislation in reducing the environmental impact of HFCs.

air conditioning units utilising the new refrigerant R32

R32 has a GWP of 675 compared to R410A refrigerant which has a GWP of 2,088 and Dickinson sees this as an important reason why the market is expected to move quickly to the new refrigerant: “Not only will this help businesses demonstrate what they are doing to help the environment, the use of R32 also allows the Mr Slim units to offer increased efficiency compared to equivalent R410A models.”

Mitsubishi Electric is first to the UK market with such an expansive line-up and the new R32 Mr Slim Power Inverter models have been built specifically for the new refrigerant.

The range includes ten outdoor units offering single-phase and 3-phase options, with a capacity range from 3.5 to 14kW.  25 individual indoor units are also available as ceiling cassettes, ceiling concealed ducted, wall-mounted and ceiling suspended models.  Mr Slim Power Inverters are also available in twin and triple multi-split configurations delivering complete flexibility for system designers.

The Mr Slim R32 Power Inverter models bring together the latest technology, whilst maintaining the familiarity of the current Mr Slim Power Inverter range as Dickinson explains: “The size, look, feel and controls for the new R32 models remain the same as existing R410A Power Inverter models so that changing over to R32 will be as easy as possible for building owners.

“We have recognised that familiarity is important for global brands, such as high street retailers that need to ensure consistency of design, whatever size of building they operate,” he adds, “this should make it easier for companies that want to embrace R32 to show how they are helping combat global warming.”

Not only do the systems offer better performance at the same price, they also offer longer pipe runs with 100 metres available on the 10kW, 12.5kW and 14kW models – 25 metres longer than the equivalent R410A versions and the longest currently available on the market. This includes a 30 metre lift that is unique in the UK. The longer pipe runs are designed to make Mr Slim R32 even more flexible and allow systems to be installed where previous site restrictions would not allow.

Mr Slim R32 Power Inverter models are available in twin and triple split configurations and offer full heating capacity down to -3ºC. The range also includes Mitsubishi Electric’s unique Replace technology which can utilise existing pipework, making it ideal for office and retail refurbishments.

R32 units have already been available in Japan for over two years now and we have taken that knowledge and experience and refined it to develop this advanced line up, which improves efficiency, increases pipe runs and adds other benefits too,” explains Dickinson.

The new R32 Mr Slim line-up is available from July 2017 and further information is available on the dedicated website www.timeforr32.co.uk/pr4, which also includes product information sheets, videos and infographics on the background to the introduction of R32 refrigerant and our products. 

The history of home heating and the rise of renewables

Article by Ellina Webb ~ Marketing Specialist at Mitsubishi Electric

We’re all users of a home, whether we own it, rent it, or just occupy it and ensuring we have a comfortable and warm home environment is now seen as an expectation of modern life.

But it hasn’t always been possible to take a warm home for granted and things haven’t always been as easy as they are today.

Since the days when early man first discovered fire and used it to keep the ‘cave’ warm and the wolves from the door, we have found ways to refine how we use that flame.

From the wood-burning days through to the industrialisation of the Victorian age and the introduction of coal, lighting a fire has been the main source of heat for the home.

renewable energy

Until the turn of the 20th Century therefore, this open flame in a home wasn’t just for aesthetics – or to make you feel Hygge it was the only option available and for those petticoat wearing Victorian women, the hazard of accidental death from fire was a very real threat.

In the 1930’s, we started to see the introduction of electric forms of heating, and the introduction of a gas network from the 1950’s and 60’s, saw this fuel start to dominate the world of domestic heating.

Mitsubishi Electric - The Hub

Mitsubishi Electric - The Hub

However, it wasn’t until the 1970’s and 80’s that we started to see an increase in central heating, predominantly using gas boilers and this still remains the standard for most.

But a reliance on fossil fuels; gas, coal and oil will soon need to become history because as we all know, we cannot continue like this.

So what does the future of our home heating and hot water look like?

As a heat pump manufacturer, you would expect us to promote air source systems but we are not the only ones saying it – The UK government has already recognised that heat pumps have a major role to play in keeping our homes warm and cosy well into the future.

By extracting and harvesting ‘free’ heat energy from the outdoor air, heat pumps are recognised as renewable and qualify for government incentives in the form of the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI).

This is designed to offset the slightly higher capital costs of investing in renewables and is starting to have a significant impact on the traditional heating market as more people accept that they have to play their part.

Mitsubishi Electric - The Hub
Heat pumps are suitable from a variety of homes including pre-1930s, 1930-2010, 2010 – present and new build / self build properties.

At the moment, this is also taking the form of adding a heat pump to an existing heating system but as pressure on new housebuilders grows to clearly demonstrate they are delivering sustainable homes for the future, the government fully expects heat pumps to become the norm for home heating.

The other important factor to consider is that as the nation ‘greens’ production of energy with the increased use of wind, solar and even tidal energy production, then heat pumps become even greener.

Mitsubishi Electric - The Hub

So, the history of home heating has been an interesting journey so far but has relied predominantly on burning something to produce heat – a large part of which is often wasted up a chimney or flue.

In reality though, it’s quite scary to see how slow things have changed. It’s only now that the clock to a low carbon future really is ticking so we have to pull together to ensure we pick up the pace and move with the times.

https://thehub.mitsubishielectric.co.uk

The environmental lessons to be learnt from Dr Seuss

Article by Ellina Webb ~ Marketing Specialist at Mitsubishi Electric

To celebrate International Children’s Book Day it only seems appropriate to talk about a book with an overarching environmental theme.

The book in question is The Lorax by Dr Seuss which tells the story of the effects of pollution, deforestation and climate change after the forest of “Truffula trees” is chopped down.

Dr Seuss was a writer who was frequently inspired by political topics like the environmental movement, which allowed him to channel his negativity into magical and meaningful children’s literature – such as The Cat in the Hat, Horton Hears a Who and Oh! The Places You Will Go.

To some his underlying use of political themes might be viewed as controversial, especially in children’s storybooks, but as an adult reflecting on this story – which was a must-read of my primary school curriculum, the environmental messages are certain…and scary. Nevertheless, I’m glad that these books have subtly informed me and taught me that even though the world is full of issues, if you care, you can help to make them better.

To start, I’m going to give you a quick summary of the story:

A boy living in a polluted area of town seeks to discover what happened to the Lorax. To discover this he visits a man called Once-ler in the place where the “Grickle –grass grows”. While visiting Once-ler he hears the sad story of how Once-ler chopped down all the Truffula trees to fund his manufacturing business, destroying the home of the animals and polluting the air and water. This in turn drove the Lorax away and the Once-ler now lives alone and with deep regret of his selfish actions.

Re–reading the short story of the Lorax which was published in 1971, it’s clear what the important themes are that Dr Seuss has focused on and it’s sad that over 40 years later (and well over 20 years after the death of Theodor Seuss Geisel) these themes are still major issues that we face today.

So what are the themes and how are they still relevant today?

Deforestation

The major catalyst to the Lorax leaving was the cutting down of all the trees. The Lorax speaks for the trees “for the trees have no tongues” and unfortunately all his speaking did could not save them – especially as the innovation in Once-ler’s axe technology quadrupled his turnover of tree harvesting!

In real life and in today’s terms, deforestation is devastating to our planet and at the current rate of deforestation the world’s rainforests could completely vanish in a hundred years. The most common reasons behind deforestation are agriculture, logging and urban sprawl. The biggest impact deforestation has is on the 80% of the earth’s animals and plants that live there. While for climate change, no trees means dryer soils and less absorption of greenhouse gasses.

Mitsubishi Electric - The Hub
Deforestation is a primary threat to animals like the Orangutan

Poor respect for the environment

If you work for a large corporation, the term Corporate Social Responsibility might be something you have heard quite a lot about.  Respecting the environment from a business level has thankfully become quite important in the past few years, but for the average individual, is respecting the environment still a challenge that we need educating on? In 2015 The Telegraph reported on a government survey that showed how only 18% of Britons are “very concerned” about climate change. So does that show that they have no driver behind pro-activity respecting the environment – like Once-ler?

It’s a question we ask ourselves over on our Green Gateway Twitter page (@green_gateway) so feel free to discuss your thoughts with us on there.

The importance of plants

As previously mentioned, less trees means drier soils and less absorption of greenhouse gasses. But on an everyday scale, trees and plants are so much more than that. Plants, like in the story of the Lorax, provide shelter, food, oxygen and water purification. Without the Truffula trees the pollution from Once-ler’s factory destroys the quality of the air and the water, changing the landscape and driving the animals away. Beyond this, plants also provide medicine and store carbon dioxide, helping us reduce the impact of other environmental threats like the burning of fossil fuels.

The impact of pollution

Aside from the physical impact of pollution, the Lorax touches on the impact of pollution from over manufacturing “your machine chugs on, day and night without stop, making gluppity-glupp. Also schloppity-schlopp”. According to Conserve Energy Future, any form of pollution can be traced back to industrial practices. This can be seen in countries that face a rapid growth of industry. The contamination and effects of this are so vast that they would require an article in themselves to do them justice. But if Dr Seuss’ exploration of this theme is something you want to delve into further, the more in-depth Lorax film from 2012 is definitely worth watching.

Mitsubishi Electric - The Hub
Industrial pollution
Industrial waste is a large contributor to global pollution

So relating this back to International Children’s Book Day, I hope you appreciate why The Lorax is not just an enchantingly poetic story. It is also worthy of being in the realm of children’s classics, like his other work: Oh! The Places You Will Go, this has deep and touching meaning that will leave children and adults alike questioning their impact in the world we live in today.

Ellina Webb is a Marketing Specialist at Mitsubishi Electric

If you have any questions about this article or want to know more, please email us. We will contact the author and will get back to you as soon as we can.

Animation highlights renewable heating potential for commercial buildings

A new animation from Mitsubishi Electric is highlighting how commercial premises can benefit from reliable, renewable heating to help reduce energy bills whilst also qualifying for 20 years of Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) payments.

“Over half the emissions from a typical commercial property are due to water and space heating and finding ways to reduce energy here can make a real difference to people bills and the nation’s carbon reduction targets,” explains Graham Temple, marketing manager for the company’s range of Ecodan commercial heating systems.

renewable heating

Heat pumps are recognised by both EU and UK Governments as renewable because they maximise the amount of heating for every kilowatt of electricity consumed.

The short animation focuses on two renewable heat pump products in the market-leading Ecodan range, with the packaged, Monobloc CAHV air source system and the CRHV ground or water-source solution.

renewable heating

Both will connect to radiators or underfloor heating systems and can work independently or in conjunction with other heating systems.

The units are also modular, meaning they can be installed in phases to increase design flexibility and will work in rotation to match demand and prolong equipment life.

The air source is available up to 688kW and the ground/water source will deliver 960kW, making them ideal for many commercial buildings, whether new-build or refurbishments.

“We’ve used a school in the animation, but the principles also apply to almost any commercial building owner who wants to reduce energy bills and receive RHI payments,” adds Temple.

To view the animation visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rRyOqlf8hag or call 01707 282880 for further information.

%d bloggers like this: